Top 6 pumpkin pulp hacks

It’s almost Halloween… and that means one thing: PUMPKINS. Did you know that more than half of the 24 million pumpkins carved for Halloween in Britain won’t be eaten?

A poll of 3000 adults in the UK carried out by the food charity Hubbub concluded that 12.76 million pumpkins will be carved and then thrown away. Astonishingly, 42% of Brits don’t even know the pulp is edible!

Now, we’re sure you’re quite the pumpkin buff (certainly not one of the 42%) but I bet you didn’t know you could make body scrub (yes, that’s right) out of pumpkin pulp? Or a tasty pumpkin beer? Not to mention pumpkin liqueur!

Enticed? Same. Check out these delicious uses for all of that pumpkin pulp you were going to throw away.

Pumpkin Stock and Soup

One of the easiest and most comforting ways of putting your pumpkin waste to good use is in a stock. Just throw all your pulp (try and keep the seeds… we’ll be getting to those!) into a big saucepan with onions and any other left-over veg you’ve got. Add boiling water and simmer for an hour or so. Strain, and voila! A delicious autumnal stock, perfect for soup or stews. In fact, now you’ve got your delicious pumpkin stock, what better than to use it as the base for a warming pumpkin soup!?

 

Add garlic, carrots, cream (and a bay leaf if you’re feeling fancy) to your now-roughly-diced pumpkin in a pan and reduce to create the perfect spooky soup!

Recipe courtesy of BBC Good Food

Pumpkin Ale 

Yes, I know what you’re thinking: “pumpkin ale” sounds like something you’d order in a Ye Olde tavern after a hard day’s work defeating dragons and slaying giant snakes. 

But yes. Pumpkin Ale is a thing. For all of you home-brewers out there, this is the perfect Halloween treat. A strong winter lager with a full-bodied, sweet and warming flavour, it’s a must-try. For those of you who’ve not yet used that fermenting barrel and craft beer kit they got for Christmas, this is your chance to put it to good use!

Recipe courtesy of Hubbub

Pumpkin Seed Oil

Often referred to as ‘green gold’, pumpkin seed oil has a nutty taste and is packed with nutrients, including vitamins B1, B6, E, A and K. It’s also a great source of calcium and magnesium. The catch? It isn’t too easy to produce. For the oiliest seeds, Styrian Pumpkins are the best. The only problem is that they are grown almost exclusively in Austria. Supermarket-bought pumpkins’ seeds will do the trick, they just won’t produce the same amount of oil. To harness the magical powers of their seeds, simply roast them and then crush ‘em.

Pumpkin Liqueur

If you don’t have the time or taste for strong pumpkin ale, then why not opt for the quicker and easier, endlessly drinkable option: Pumpkin Liqueur. Simple and inexpensive, impress with a homemade tipple this spooky season.

 What you’ll need:

1. Flavourings like cloves, cinnamon, allspice, lemon peel and ginger make a great mix.

2. Sugar

3. Pumpkin, of course.

4. A spirit of your choice!

Recipe courtesy of Food Republic

Pumpkin Body Scrub

We get it, you’ve probably already turned all of your pumpkin mash into liqueur. Fine. So buy another pumpkin and follow these instructions. Life’s too short. 

But, if you’re being well behaved (or you really do have that much pumpkin - a monster-pumpkin) then we’ve got you covered… literally. But not in an inappropriate way or anything, just your good old-fashioned full-body scrub. 

Raw pumpkin has natural enzymes that eat away layers of dead skin cells (nice...) and rejuvenate skin texture, making it a fantastic DIY body scrub! Simply mix pureed pumpkin with coarse sugar or salt, a bit of honey and moisturising sweet almond oil (aloe would work too) and you have a potent Pumpkin-sugar body scrub! Snack while you scour! 

*Disclaimer* Please do not snack on your body scrub, while it smells nice… it's not that tasty...

Often referred to as ‘green gold’, pumpkin seed oil has a nutty taste and is packed with nutrients, including vitamins B1, B6, E, A and K. It’s also a great source of calcium and magnesium. The catch? It isn’t too easy to produce. For the oiliest seeds, Styrian Pumpkins are the best. The only problem is that they are grown almost exclusively in Austria. Supermarket-bought pumpkins’ seeds will do the trick, they just won’t produce the same amount of oil. To harness the magical powers of their seeds, simply roast them and then crush ‘em.